Geekalicious Recommends... September 2012

Geekalicious Recommends


Welcome to the second "Geekalicious Recommends".  Here are some geek and tech links that I have really enjoyed this month.


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We shall start with a bit of self-promotion.  Over on Typecast I had a bit of a rant about an approach from a company called Flubit.  I'm all for a bit of innovative marketing but I still haven't found out how they obtained my personal details (my 'public' name isn't the same as my 'real' name).  The more I think about it and discuss this subject, the more I am convinced that they bought a mailing list.  It may have even been from a competition that I entered (I usually participate in additional entries on Twitter and Facebook so their marketing strategy would seemingly be fitting).  So, for me, the lesson is, check the small print and ensure that you have that teeny tiny box un/ticked appropriately.  What do you think?

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Have you read about why Leo Traynor met his internet troll?  Trolling has taken on many forms online over the years and, using mobile devices, it could be considered to be easier to troll someone.  Leo explains that with a bit of help he managed to track down his own internet troll but was shocked to find out who it was.  You may be surprised at the way in which he dealt with it too.

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Phil Szomszor highlights an interesting Twitter campaign that seemingly backfired this week.  The #WaitroseReasons meme was subject to some ridicule on the hashtag stream and they have attempted to join in to consolidate their position.  Phil asks if they really thought this very public approach through properly.

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On the Phronesis SEO blog, Bob Bardsley talks about the power of on-page SEO (Search Engine Optimisation).  He mentions the new Google Panda update (penalising page rank for paid or suspicious link building) and how using a copywriter can improve your unique content.

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A feature on Guardian Money spectacularly misquoted a fellow Twitter user this week.  Centered around Kellogg's Special K crisps and their pop-up shop in London (a marketing exercise), @melaina25 was targeted after she shared a picture of the crisps and information about their "points value" for a specific diet.  The author of the article did not read (or quote) the tweet in full nor did she complete her research correctly.  So my question is "Can certain Guardian journalists be trusted? The number of misprints and misquotes seriously makes me wonder..." 

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As ever, there is some glorious content on the ProBlogger blog this month but detailing the nine elements of the perfect post is a really good one to bookmark and revisit.  It hightlights the necessary features of a webpage.  Even though it sounds like it is pretty basic information, sometimes we can get sidetracked by all the unnecessary blah happening in the sidebar. 

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And lets finish on a funny.  I have a feeling that the b3ta membership is responsible for most of the crackpot reviews on Amazon but Debbie from Kommein has highlighted twenty-one products with the best and funniest fake reviews.  I'm including this just because the good Catholic girl in me spotted the communion wafers too.  And, just in cae you're wondering... YES, the canvas print of Paul Ross is featured on there too.  HOORAY!

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I hope you enjoy these recommendations.  Also, if you have a blog post that you'd like me to include in the next round up send me a link by email and I'll give it a read through.  I'm always looking for new blogs to read and recommend.


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